2017 Funding Allocation Hero Background Image

2017 Funding Allocations

Cycle for Survival fights back against rare cancers with 100% of every dollar. This extraordinary community funds groundbreaking clinical trials, research studies, and technologies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Within six months of the events, donations support a bold research enterprise—empowering scientists and doctors to make lifesaving discoveries and advance trailblazing innovations that will help patients everywhere. Raising $34 million this year—and more than $140 million in the eleven years since inception—is all thanks to the determined riders, supporters, patients, researchers, and physicians who are making a lasting impact.

$34,000,000

Adrenocortical Carcinoma
Angiosarcoma
Bladder Cancer
Blood Cancer
Brain Cancer
Cholangiocarcinoma
Clear Cell Ovarian Cancer
Endometrial Cancer
Esophageal Cancer
Ewing Sarcoma
Germ Cell Tumors
GIST

Granular Cell Tumors
Gynecological Sarcoma
Kidney Cancer
Leiomyosarcoma
Leukemia
Liposarcoma
Lymphoma
Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors
Merkel Cell Carcinoma
Melanoma
Mesothelioma
Multiple Myeloma
Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Neuroblastoma
Osteosarcoma
Ovarian Cancer
Pancreatic Cancer
Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors
Retinoblastoma
Rhabdomyosarcoma
Sarcoma
Synovial Sarcoma
Testicular Cancer
Thyroid Cancer
Uterine Cancer

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Funded Research

Funded Research

MSK is on the frontline of the battle against rare cancers. Cycle for Survival is proud to support the advancement of comprehensive initiatives at MSK, which span across many critical areas of research.

When cancer is identified early, the likelihood of survival increases by 80 percent. Imagine finding someone’s disease long before it fully develops into cancer—and having the power to stop it immediately. Precision prevention is a new field set to change the future of cancer as we know it.

Most current screening methods are insufficient, and many miss the first signs of cancer entirely. Two exceptions are the Pap smear and colonoscopy: both find cancer at its earliest, most treatable stage. Cycle for Survival is seeding a groundbreaking endeavor, run by Luis Diaz, MD, which applies the concepts of precision medicine to healthy individuals in a bold step to ultimately increase survival rates. The team is creating tools to screen and flag those people most likely to develop cancer—triggering a life-saving medical intervention to reduce any chance of disease progression.

Epigenetics is an entirely different approach to understanding and treating cancer. By reversing diseased cells back into healthy ones, patients are spared the dangerous side effects of traditional therapy. Regarded by many as the next frontier of oncology, MSK is pursuing high-impact trials and research into how epigenetic drugs affect cell behavior.

While radiation and chemotherapy fight disease, they can harm the rest of the body. In contrast, epigenetics focuses on the mechanisms by which all of the cells in our body adopt different roles, and which are markedly altered in cancerous ones. By studying how genes are irregularly turned on and off in cancer cells, MSK President and CEO Dr. Craig Thompson, Dr. Ross Levine, and others are developing new drugs that turn cells back to normal after they malfunction and become malignant. Cycle for Survival is funding innovative laboratory research and clinical trials exploring the effect of epigenetics in cancer development and the role of drugs that reverse these alterations. They will test two types of therapies, paired with other drugs to simultaneously target multiple genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Thanks to Cycle for Survival, science becomes medicine.

The CMO has ushered in a new era of cancer research, diagnosis, and treatment—leading to answers and hope for patients who otherwise had none. Cycle for Survival continues to support this transformative effort. The CMO fuels MSK’s expansive precision oncology venture, identifying cancer-driving genetic mutations and targeting them with superb accuracy.

In this era of personalized medicine, all roads lead back to the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology (CMO). Directed by Dr. David Solit, the CMO’s reach stretches far and runs deep. Thanks to Cycle for Survival, CMO researchers are constantly improving MSK-IMPACT, the all-important test used by physicians and scientists to explore and find the genetic mutations that cause cancer. The team recently hit a major milestone: announcing the results of their first 10,000 tumors sequenced. Undoubtedly this work is just getting started, and with Cycle for Survival’s backing, so much more will be achieved.

The future of cancer treatment is all about precision: how to tackle each patient’s unique disease with a personalized approach. Pathology makes this possible—and at MSK, these samples are stored in a state-of-the-art “biobank.” Cycle for Survival’s investment created this powerful infrastructure, laying the foundation for pace-setting rare cancer research.

Led by Dr. Michael Roehrl, the Precision Pathology Biobanking Center is the nucleus for MSK’s clinical and molecular data: used by physicians and scientists throughout MSK to better understand their patients’ disease and adjust therapy, all in real-time. The Center feeds a wide breadth of programs, and is a springboard for a rapidly growing field called “theranostics”—when pathology, diagnostics, and treatment are evaluated in an integrated manner for each patient to make the best, most personalized plan. Thanks to Cycle for Survival’s support in 2016 and 2017, MSK’s next-generation biobank is poised to maximize the full potential of data to outsmart cancer.

The Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program (HOPP) is constantly pushing the boundaries of possibility for patients battling cancer. Drawing together expert physician-scientists with a range of specialties, HOPP is taking on cancer, one person—one breakthrough—at a time.

Led by Dr. Charles Sawyers, HOPP is essential to MSK’s “translational” research program: ideas and scientific observations from the lab are turned into new approaches to help rare cancer patients everywhere. Thanks to Cycle for Survival, HOPP continues to foster paradigm-changing, imaginative research targeting many rare cancers. Year after year, Cycle for Survival has been a proud partner with HOPP—providing vital resources to this wide-reaching scientific machine. Progress generated from this unique enterprise not only informs and guides the investigations underway at MSK, but impacts oncology research globally.

The Jennifer Goodman Linn Laboratory of New Drug Development in Sarcoma and Rare Cancers—named in honor of Cycle for Survival’s founder—is a constant reminder of why we fight. To treat more than 70 types of sarcoma, MSK is exploring ways to match the right drug to the right person.

MSK’s Sarcoma Medical Oncology Service, directed by Dr. William Tap is leading research to better understand these diseases, and grow the arsenal of options to counter them. Cycle for Survival is advancing MSK’s immunotherapy program—turning the immune system against sarcoma. One study uses drugs to stop cancer cells from growing; another evaluates immunotherapy’s effect on pediatric sarcomas. MSK is also finding ways to predict patient response, so the best drug can be chosen from the start. Another Cycle for Survival project will determine if the genetic drivers behind other cancers cause sarcoma—a major step toward better treatments.

One of the biggest unrealized opportunities in cancer research today is big data. Cycle for Survival’s instrumental support of computational oncology will bolster MSK’s groundbreaking program to mine this unprecedented influx of genomic and clinical data—and discover what matters most to help patients battle cancer.

Contained in a single tumor sample are potentially thousands and thousands of genetic mutations. To identify which should be targeted with anti-cancer therapies, Drs. Nikolaus Schultz and Barry Taylor look for common threads within this great diversity of molecular changes. Cycle for Survival is advancing their work in translational genomics: using DNA sequencing to help patients fight cancer right now. Recognizing that cancer changes and evolves—becoming harder to wipe out—their groups leverage sequencing data to stay a step ahead. By tracking how rare cancers evade treatment, alternate approaches can be implemented sooner—and save lives.

Major discoveries into the hows and whys of leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma have delivered promising new options for patients everywhere. Cycle for Survival is advancing research and innovation across multiple fronts—synergizing how laboratory science is swiftly translated into new ways of helping people fight blood cancer today.

Directed by Dr. Ross Levine, the Center for Hematologic Malignancies is an MSK-wide collaboration that brings therapies to patients faster than ever before based on new insights from MSK scientists. The team is conducting a series of clinical trials to evaluate drugs aimed at the behavior of cells—uncovering ways to effectively combat cancer, with fewer side effects. This research relies on genomic sequencing, a predictor of whether someone’s disease will respond to treatment, and on state-of-the-art laboratory research designed to identify and test novel, more effective treatments. Cycle for Survival will continue supporting testing every rare blood cancer patient at MSK: analytics that build out a robust data platform, allowing seamless integration of genomics into all future studies.

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Equinox Innovation Initiative

Dr. Vittoria Arslan-Carlon
Anesthesiology & Critical Care Medicine
Neurodevelopment of Retinoblastoma Patients

Dr. Ping Chi
Sarcoma Oncology Service
Tumors Deficient in the SMARCB-1 Gene

Dr. Alexander Drilon
Thoracic Oncology Service
Resistance to NTRK Inhibitors

Dr. Daniel Heller
Molecular Pharmacology & Chemistry
New Approaches in Drug Delivery for Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients

Dr. Prasad Jallepalli
Molecular Biology
DNA Replication

Dr. Andrew Kung
Chair, Department of Pediatrics
Treating Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors

Dr. Marc Ladanyi
Chief, Molecular Diagnostics Service
Strategies for Targeting Pediatric Sarcoma

Dr. Ross Levine
Director, Center for Hematologic Malignancies
Role of Genomics in Development and Treatment of Leukemia

Dr. Elli Papaemmanuil
Epidemiology & Biostatistics
Genetic Mutations in Ovarian Clear Cell Cancer

Drs. David Scheinberg and Andrea Schietinger
Molecular Pharmacology Program
Targeting Genetic Mutations for Immune Response in Patients

Dr. Bryan Tsou
Cell Biology Program
Role of Two Genes Found in Abundance in Tumors

Dr. Omar Abdel-Wahab
Hematologic Oncology
Targeting Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Drs. Fresia Pareja, Jorge Reis-Filho, and Britta Weigelt
HOPP
Understanding Granular Cell Tumors

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Select Projects

Dr. Ghassan Abou-Alfa
Gastrointestinal Oncology Service
Cholangiocarcinoma

Dr. David Abramson
Chief, Ophthalmic Oncology Service
Retinoblastoma

Dr. Nadeem Abu-Rustum
Chief, Gynecology Service
Ovarian and Uterine Cancer

Dr. Srikanth Ambati
Department of Pediatrics
Sarcoma

Dr. Cristina Antonescu
Director, Bone and Soft Tissue Pathology
Angiosarcoma, GIST, Rhabdomyosarcoma

Dr. Chris Barker
Radiation Oncology
Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Dr. Mary Baylies
Developmental Biology Program
Rhabdomyosarcoma

Dr. Robert Benezra
Cancer Biology and Genetics Program
Brain Cancer

Dr. Bernard Bochner
Urology Service
Bladder Cancer

Dr. Jayanta Chaudhuri
Immunology Program
Lymphoma

Dr. Dennis Chi
Deputy Chief, Gynecology Service
Ovarian Cancer

Dr. John Chodera
Computational Biology Program
Cancer Drug Resistance

Dr. Lisa DeAngelis
Chair, Department of Neurology
Brain Cancer

Dr. Mark Dickson
Sarcoma Service
Sarcoma

Dr. Ira Dunkel
Department of Pediatrics
Pediatric Brain Cancer

Dr. Joseph Erinjeri
Interventional Radiology Service
Interventional Radiology

Dr. Darren Feldman
Genitourinary Oncology Service
Testicular Cancer; Germ Cell Tumors

Dr. Emily Foley
Cell Biology Program
Ovarian and Uterine Cancer

Dr. Igor Gavrilovic
Neurology Service
Brain Cancer

Dr. Sergio Geralt
Chief, Adult Bone Marrow Transplant Service
Multiple Myeloma

Dr. Michael Glickman
Immunology Program
Bladder Cancer

Dr. Jan Grimm
Molecular Pharmacology Program
Molecular Imaging

Dr. Philip Gutin
Chair, Department of Neurosurgery
Brain Cancer

Dr. Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis
Developmental Biology Program
Cell Lineage Development

Dr. John Healey
Chief, Orthopaedic Service
Bone Cancer

Dr. Daniel Heller
Molecular Pharmacology Program
Nanomedicine

Dr. Martee Hensley
Gynecologic Medical Oncology Service
Gynecologic Sarcomas

Dr. Alan Ho
Head and Neck Oncology Service
Thyroid Cancer

Dr. Danwei Huangfu
Developmental Biology Program
Pancreatic Cancer

Dr. Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue
Associate Director for Translational Research, Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research
Pancreatic Cancer

Dr. Andrew Intlekofer
Lymphoma Service
Lymphoma

Dr. Yelena Janjigian
Gastrointestinal Oncology Service
Esophogeal Cancer

Dr. William Jarnagin
Chief, Hepatopancreatobiliary Service
Gallbladder cancer

Dr. Xuejun Jiang
Cell Biology Program
Cell Autophagy

Dr. Alexandra Joyner
Developmental Biology Program
Pediatric Brain Cancer

Dr. Yasmin Khakoo
Director, Child Neurology Program
Pediatric Brain Tumors

Dr. Alex Kentsis
Department of Pediatrics; Molecular Pharmacology Program
Pediatric Leukemia

Dr. Kitai Kim
Cancer Biology & Genetics Program
Leukemia and Lymphoma

Dr. Virginia Klimek
Leukemia Service
Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Dr. Andrew Koff
Molecular Biology Program
Glioma and Liposarcoma

Dr. Jason Konner
Chief, Medical Oncology at MSK Monmouth
Clear Cell Ovarian Cancer

Dr. Andrew Kung
Chair, Department of Pediatrics
Pediatric Cancer

Dr. Brian Kushner
Department of Pediatrics
Neuroblastoma

Dr. Michael La Quaglia
Chief, Pediatric Surgical Service
Pediatric Sarcomas

Dr. Eric Lai
Developmental Biology Program
Cell Proliferation

Dr. Christina Leslie
Computational Biology Program
Cell Biology

Dr. Ming Li
Immunology Program
Immunotherapy

Dr. Scott Lowe
Chair, Cancer Biology & Genetics Program
Cholangiocarcinoma

Dr. Vicky Makker
Gynecologic Medical Oncology Service
Gynecologic Cancers

Dr. Christine Mayr
Cancer Biology and Genetics Program
Cell and Protein Functions

Dr. Paul Meyers
Department of Pediatrics
Sarcoma

Dr. Shakeel Modak
Department of Pediatrics
Neuroblastoma

Dr. Craig Moskowitz
Lymphoma and Hematology Services
Blood Cancer

Dr. Robert Motzer
Genitourinary Oncology Service
Kidney Cancer

Dr. Philipp Niethammer
Cell Biology Program
Inflammatory Signals Guiding Blood Cells

Dr. Roisin O’Cearbhaill
Gynecologic Medical Oncology Service
Ovarian Cancer

Dr. Richard O’Reilly
Chief, Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Service
Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Dr. Eileen O’Reilly
Associate Director for Clinical Research, Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research
Pancreatic Cancer

Dr. Kenneth Offit
Chief, Clinical Genetics Service
Ovarian Cancer

Dr. Michael Overholtzer
Cell Biology Program
Metastatic Melanoma and Prostate Cancer

Dr. Luis Parada
Director, Brain Tumor Center
Brain Cancer

Dr. John Petrini
Director, Functional Genomics Initiative; Chair, Molecular Biology
Myodysplasia

Dr. Michael Postow
Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service
Melanoma

Dr. Xiaohui Qu
Molecular Biology Program
Gene Expression

Dr. Diane Reidy Lagunes
Gastrointestinal Oncology Service
Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Adrenocortical Carcinoma

Dr. Neal Rosen
Molecular Pharmacology Program
Cholangiocarcinoma

Dr. Alexander Rudensky
Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy
Immunotherapy Research

Dr. David Scheinberg
Molecular Pharmacology Program
Mesotheolioma

Dr. David Solit
Director, CMO; Make An Impact
DNA Sequencing

Dr. Neal Shukla
Department of Pediatrics
Pediatric Lymphoma

Dr. Amber Simpson
Memorial Hospital Research Laboratories
Gallbladder cancer

Dr. Samuel Singer
Chief, Gastric and Mixed Tumor Service
Sarcoma

Dr. Lorenz Studer
Developmental Biology Program
Cell Biology

Dr. Joseph Sun
Immunology Program
Leukemia

Dr. Tanya Trippett
Department of Pediatrics
Pediatric Blood Cancers

Dr. Meng-Fu Tsou
Cell Biology Program
Cell Development

Dr. Andrea Ventura
Cancer Biology & Genetics Program
Identify Non-Coding RNA

Dr. Leonard Wexler
Department of Pediatrics
Rhabdomyosarcoma

Dr. Jedd Wolchok
Chief, Melanoma & Immunotherapeutics Service
Immunotherapy

Dr. Joao Xavier
Computational Biology Program
Metabolism of Cancer Cells

Dr. Xiaolan Zhao
Molecular Biology Program
Cell Repair

December Challenge

The December Challenge:
Funding Supercomputing to Accelerate Research

This past December, the Cycle for Survival community raised $1.5 million to fund new supercomputing equipment to unlock the power of genetic data—and deliver more personalized treatments to patients worldwide.

DNA sequencing provides key insights into what causes cancer. Today’s technologies have led to an influx of data with the potential to significantly advance the development of cancer therapies. Supercomputers—a powerful network of interconnected computers—interpret and analyze trillions of data points to uncover patterns impossible to see with the naked eye. Armed with this new equipment, researchers will be able to find answers that human analysis alone cannot solve.

Participants who met the Challenge—raising at least $1,000 by the end of December—have their names displayed in the MSK lab that houses supercomputing machinery.

December Challenge Poster

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2016 Funding Allocation

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2015 Funding Allocation

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2014 Funding Allocation

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2013 Funding Allocation

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